Robin Casey, aka Roz Draws, is a graphic designer based in Portland, Oregon. #TeamBamboo recently spent time in her studio to learn about her process during the creation of the #BambooMonthOfLove project, which is twenty-eight distinct Valentine’s cards celebrating Bamboo partners past and present.

Robin Casey deep in thought and hard at work with her Bamboo Slate.
Robin Casey deep in thought and hard at work with her Bamboo Slate.

 

About the project:

I got my first tablet when I started art school, and haven’t had one project since that a tablet hasn’t been one of my biggest assets. I might as well be surgically attached to my Intuos tablet. I love it. I am the artist I am today because of the tools that Wacom and Bamboo provide. It’s been a pleasure getting to spend time with the team and let them know how I work during the #BambooMonthofLove project development. I loved creating for and partnering with a brand I not only use, but admire.

When I received this venture, I quickly realized that each of these twenty-eight partners holds a unique spot in their respective industries and that each of them are people focused. This series proved that the creative community is broad yet cohesive, especially in the city of Roses where many of these brands reside.

I am happy to join forces as an artist with a company that supports this wide variety of creatives, myself included. Bamboo is about bringing people and concepts together, supporting them as they take their ideas to the next level. The tools help the process but how we use our tools in the creative process is totally individual. This project was a fun challenge of visually establishing that individuality, as well as showing their cohesive nature.

 About the tools and the process:

Here’s a peek into my workflow and how I created the #BambooMonthofLove with my Bamboo Slate smartpad.

  1. Research.

I didn’t know many of these brands or individuals, so I began this project with research. I took in the videos, read the stories, and saw the brands in their own words. I began thinking about how to capture everything in a style that was simultaneously consistent and fun.

  1. Brainstorming.

Next came the data dump or brainstorm portion of the project.  The majority of the partners had been using the Bamboo Slate for sketching, creating interactive workspaces and collaborating with their coworkers. I wanted to give the pieces a not-too-perfect look while simultaneously creating a stylized appearance that was cohesive once seen as a whole. The goal with all of the pieces was a sense of each brand or person and their connection with Bamboo.

  1. Thumbnail.

After I had my rough concepts in mind, I created a thumbnail with the Bamboo Slate. This allowed me to have a rough outline of what I wanted each of the twenty-eight concepts to look like. This also gave me a reference point for my to-do list.

Created on a Bamboo Slate, this thumbnail let Robin stay organized and on task during the #BambooMonthofLove project.
Created on a Bamboo Slate, this thumbnail let Robin stay organized and on task during the #BambooMonthofLove project.
  1. Frame.

I then took time to create a frame on the pad I was using with the Bamboo Slate so that each piece I eventually created would be the same size. Tracing the frame on each page of the notebook kept the work balanced. Working on a batch of five or so brands at a time managed my time and kept me on task.

  • My first step was to draw in pencil each concept on one of my framed page.
  • I then drew over each penciled item with a Bamboo Slate smart pen so that the work was captured digitally.
Here are some of Robin's rough pieces, created by hand on a Bamboo Slate smartpad.
Here are some of Robin’s rough pieces, created by hand on a Bamboo Slate smartpad.
  1. Import + Color.

With the touch of a button, my work was digitized and saved in the Wacom Inkspace App. I then uploaded the pieces into Dropbox so I could work on them locally from my desktop and make some adjustments before coloring.

  • Pro tip: You can also use the Adobe Illustrator app for this step. The Bamboo smartpads and Wacom tablets are very flexible for editing.
    • Now that all of my work was captured digitally and saved online, I imported each piece into Illustrator.
    • With Adobe Illustrator and my preferred Intuos tablet, I started the coloring process.
    • Much of my coloring here was about giving depth and definition to the pieces. I gave each image a half-tone texture to give them a bit of depth.
      • All were unique/separate/whole works as I prefer not to reuse pieces of previous projects.
  • Fun fact: I took inspiration from the Wacom logo colors for this project because they were fun and whimsical and lent themselves well to inspiration and subject matter for the Valentine’s Day theme.
  1. Save to final.

Once I was finished with a piece (usually about three hours of work in total), I saved the final version to send to my client.

This is one of Robin's final images, started on the Bamboo Slate and finished on the Intuos.
This is one of Robin’s final images, started on the Bamboo Slate and finished on the Intuos.

For more information on Robin Casey, please visit her website or follow her on Instagram at @Rozdraws.